‘One in five homeowners cannot afford sustainability’

‘One in five homeowners cannot afford sustainability’

Cooll: ‘Everyone should be able to participate in making their home more sustainable’

One in five homeowners cannot afford to make their home more sustainable. This is evident from a detailed analysis by the DNB (De Nederlandse Bank) published this week. Various news sources, such as Dagblad Trouw, report that the group of homeowners with a relatively low income and who live in poorly insulated houses are hit the hardest by the high energy prices.

The starting point of the analysis is the climate goals. The built environment was responsible for 13% (21.6 Mton) of Dutch greenhouse gas emissions in 2020. The 2019 national climate agreement states that we must reduce this to 15.3Mton by 2030. However, the European target is higher and has as a target a maximum emission of 11.9Mton, which is 55% of the level of 2020.

The Netherlands is therefore facing a significant increase in sustainability, the bill of which will end up on the homeowners’ plate. The DNB calculates that to completely remove the gas from houses, which costs 24000 euros. With this investment, a house meets energy label B and an electric heat pump has been installed. The conclusion of this analysis is also that 1 in 5 households cannot afford this energy transition and will be faced with energy poverty.

Cooll’s ambition is that 100% of households can participate in making their homes more sustainable. Vulnerable households with a home with an energy label of C or lower benefit a lot from Cooll’s technology. By replacing the high-efficiency boiler with a Cooll heat pump, at least 30% can be saved on the gas bill and greenhouse gas emissions.

Full analysis of DNB (in dutch): https://www.dnb.nl/publicaties/publicaties-onderzoek/analyses/financiering-voor-de-verduurzaming-van-de-woningvoorraad/

Dagblad Trouw (in dutch): https://www.trouw.nl/economie/een-op-vijf-huizenbezitters-kan-verduurzaming-niet-betalen-subsidie-schiet-tekort~b835b4d1/

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